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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to beat president obama. a look at the war in afghanistan. now the longest war. how do we get out? does obama's policy differ from president bush's and what is the effect for generations to come? joe and mika and willie join in the conversation later this hour. we begin with the debt crisis. they are trying to make a deal on the deficit. houses of congress are rolling out separate compromises to safe off a default. harry reid is meeting with mitch mcconnell to craft a solution to appeal to both parties. according to reports, this would do the following. it would allow the debt ceiling to be raised three times for a total of $2.5 trillion. in exchange, some $1.5 trillion in spending cuts would be enacted. the plan would be established to identify new deficit cuts. proposal, already, getting a lukewarm response from the fellow republicans. among them, the freshman snar mark arubio and tom coburn. take a listen. >> it gives the president the ability to raise the debt limit. the debt limit isn't the problem. the problem is the debt. the plan, as outlined to me isn't a credible solution. >>
them to show documents about them acting in afghanistan or iraq. we are going around and around. >> i think the records are well- chronicled. they lose document, they are unresponsive. they have a false negative credit reporting. all of it is going on, and it is terrible for the people. it is more terrible when they do it to our service people overseas. can you put this up? he was deployed to iraq as a the tenant in 2009-2010. his bank told his wife that she could pay using money orders. chase failed to process the payments. and they submitted inaccurate reports to the credit bureaus, which badly impacted his security clearance while he was still deployed. the military tried to help him. she described her uphill battle. she said, to be honest, i have not been able to do anything with this client. customer service refuses to talk to me without a letter of authorization. i have sent it four separate times to different facts numbers. i have left a voice messages with tebet supervisors and no one calls me back. i need to talk to a human being that will listen to the facts of the case and
of afghanistan. he sat down to interview capt. there. at the end of the interview, he realized that capt. in that isolated outpost in afghanistan, because of this hyper connectivity had access to more intelligence and more firepower than martin dempsey did when he took baghdad from saddam hussein. that has driven his whole education of the army system. at the camp, they give every new recouped and iphone and you download the application and teach the class. when you have a commander in the outpost of afghanistan with more power -- more firepower and access to intelligence than you did when he commanded the troops who took baghdad, that commander has to be trained to invent, reinvent, and adapt so much more than anyone can -- anyone 10, 15, 20 years ago. that's happening throughout the labor market. what does it mean for education? >> it means we have to educational challenges today. we need more education in better education. buy more education, and this is a challenge all of the face, we need to bring the bottom up to our average and we need to do it really fast. at the same time, we ne
was visiting an outpost in the far reaches of afghanistan. he sat down to interview capt. there. at the end of the interview, he realized that capt. in that isolated outpost in afghanistan, because of this hyper connectivity had access to more intelligence and more firepower than martin dempsey did when he took baghdad from saddam hussein. that has driven his whole education of the army system. at the camp, they give every new recouped and iphone and you download the application and teach the class. when you have a commander in the outpost of afghanistan with more power -- more firepower and access to intelligence than you did when he commanded the troops who took baghdad, that commander has to be trained to invent, reinvent, and adapt so much more than anyone can -- anyone 10, 15, 20 years ago. that's happening throughout the labor market. what does it mean for education? >> it means we have to educational challenges today. we need more education in better education. buy more education, and this is a challenge all of the face, we need to bring the bottom up to our average and we need to do
significant death. this is a man who was the most powerful man in all of south afghanistan based out of kandahar an nothing happened in that entire region without him. he controlled the area for his brother, the president hamid karzai. it was really critical for the united states because they really depended on him for their ability to move forward with the anti-taliban campaign. they held their nos because this guy was corrupt dealing in the drug trade, although he denied the allegations but it was believed he was fueling the drug trade, as well as profiting from private security contractors as well. it is something that is going to worry the u.s. about the stability of afghanistan and of the region and it will benefit the taliban. >> zain verjee, definitely a story we will continue to keep following and see what impact it does have on politics there. of course, his brother, the president. >>> the man with a huge collection of presidential memorabilia apparently tried to add to it illegally. we will tell you what went down. >>> crew members from the international space station have
" reported last year by jason carroll. he's back in afghanistan with one of those soldiers, sergeant randy shorter. >> sergeant shorter was part of the surge who arrived last august. his one-year mission is nearly complete. jason is live from shirr rana in the northeastern part of afghanistan. happy fourth of july to you, nice to see you. >> and happy fourth of july to you. i'm going to bring in randy shorter right now. i have to tell you, we now have to refer to him as first sergeant randy shorter because he's since been promoted since the last time the two of us were together. let me bring you in here now. tell us about, what was it september, august, the last time i was with you guys? >> tell me what the past several months have been like? the taliban has been exerting its influence in the area. how has it been for you? >> for me and my men it's been quite busy. getting out there, getting after it. we've been steadily, you know, helping the afghan people here. we've been promoting a lot of projects, a lot of schools, getting out there every day. >> also, congratulations on that promotio
in afghanistan's air force. >> and are training in texas. ed lavandara has more on their history making mission. >> reporter: the passion and dreams of these four women easily cuts through their broken english. >> we are going to open the door for our laid niece afghanistan. it is a big deal for us to open the door. ladies that have dreams but can't do it. we want to show them. >> reporter: these laid reese lieutenants in the afghanistan military and have come to the united states to study english at the defense language institute in texas. it is their dreams of piloting helicopters that could help change the future of women in their homeland. >> these young ladies are path finders, trail blazers. and -- as such, they are subject to the criticism and antagonism of those that don't want to see the particular path. >> reporter: the soldiers say they are prepared for the scrutiny and are confident. >> the women of afghanistan, don't be afraid of anything. if you want to do something, you can do it. just believe in yourself you can do it. >> reporter: back home, these women are battling chauvanism.
in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that message home, you need us i >>dave: and how big a concern is an attack in the united states on the 10th anniversary? >>guest: this is the first anniversary a sense of celebration and resolution and every member of al qaeda is going to want to spoil that. so you will have home green terrorists that will look at that date. >>dave: so all eyes on that date and that will be our tightest secured date so a difficult day to pull anything off? >>guest: it is possible but there are so many soft targets and the bar is so low for al qaeda because they have not pulled off another september 11th it does not have to be in new york city. >>dave: ryan, thank you for being here. millions of americans are locking for america but how can you separate yourself from the field? why who you know could be more important than what you know. giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... f greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impos
afghanistan and he's meeting with leaders there and meeting with u.s. troops. early wake-up call on the shuttle atlantis. >> ♪ i get knocked down i get back up again i get knocked down i get back up again ♪ >> seems like i just heard it on the radio yesterday. waking up to the song and today they will be supplying a supply module on the outside of the international space station using a robotic arm and they'll prepare for a space walk tomorrow. meantime, nasa keeping a close eye on some space degree that could come dangerously close to the space station. the duke and duchess of cambridge are back home in london after a 12-day tour of canada and the united states. william and kate left los angeles international airport yesterday taking up more than a dozen seats in first class on a regular british airways commercial flight. the final activity on their california trip paying tribute to the men and women in the military and helping make care packages for children of deployed service members. and those are your headlines. >> they look very much at home in america. >> they did.
. the first u.s. troops have left afghanistan. the draw down is under way. barbara starr is live for us at the pentagon. hey, barbara. >> good morning, soledad. the first of the 33,000 surge forces, in fact, yes, on their way home out of afghanistan now. u.s. officials are confirming about 650 troops mainly from the iowa national guard, left afghanistan on wednesday. they will not be replaced and that's how they're going to begin to achieve this draw down that president obama ordered. bring troops home as scheduled, don't send in new troops. soledad. >> the administration is jumping back into the don't ask, don't tell debate. what's happening now? >> well, this is really very interesting, but legally, a bit murky. the obama administration has asked a federal appeals court to suspend its ruling that would end enforcement of don't ask, don't tell in the u.s. military. what the obama administration says, it wants, is to keep to the new status quo, if you will, to follow that congressional law where the military will lift the ban on don't ask, don't tell. they're already working on it. they
of honor recipient. >> willie, so many guys that have been in that situation, iraq and afghanistan and you are involved in helping some of them. we met some of them a couple weeks back. >> yes, a group called operation men. guys severely burned in ied explosions. the thing that strikes you with them and staff sergeant petry, they want to go back. >> they all want to go back. >> they want to get back and be with their brothers. sergeant petry eight deployments. he went back after losing his hand. he went back to fight. >> we have been talking, not just this morning but days on end about what's going on in washington with the debt ceiling. sergeant petry just said something about the men and women he served with having their bodies stole from them. it's an exact quote. they have something else stolen from them. it's full recovery. it's assistance for traumatic brain injuries down the road for decades to come. we have to pay for these things. >> we do. >> they better bear down in washington, 10% as much as sergeant petry, bear down. >> it's going to be a long, long haul for the young men and
to go fight in afghanistan. >> reporter: he spent much of 2002 and 3:00 near kandahar, hunting for taliban. he came back to harvard, but in 2009 with the national guard unit, he went back to afghanistan. >> whoa! >> damn! >> i spent a lot of time with rout clearance units looking for ieds and we got hit several times and vehicles in front of me blown up. my vehicle never got hit. i was very, very lucky. when you run up there and pull open the door and see your injured buddies, you'll never forget that site. >> reporter: this time, back home, he began to explore the science of brain injury. >> what happens when the brain gets hit by a blast wave and slams up against the inside of the skull. >> reporter: with colleagues at northeastern university, parker built new tools to study how a blast affects the brain. it could be years before this leads to new treatments, but parker hopes that eventually will have a broad impact. >> concussions that your favorite football player suffers or the head injury you get when you're in a car accident and your head snaps forward or a shaking baby
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)